A positive path for spiritual living

WCR Region-Wide Events





 

Ministry Leadership Online Zoom Event

Together in Ministry

Wenesday & Thursday, October 7 & 8, 2020

REGISTER HERE

Wed., Oct 7, 2020
12:00 PM-1:00PM *Jim Blake, CEO Unity World Headquarters and
                                    *Rev. Ellen Debenport, Vice President of Communications 
 
1:00 PM-2:00PM *Rev. Patricia T. Bass Interim Chief Executive Officer, Unity Worldwide Ministries
 
Thurs., Oct 8, 2020
9:30AM-10:00AM Connection Time 
10:00AM-10:30AM Music & Spiritual Enrichment  ~ Rev. Richard Carlini
10:30AM-11:15AM Together in Ministry ~ Rev. John Riley
Business Meeting 
* Bylaw Amendment & approval
* Election of new Board Members
*  Approve Budget
11:15PM-1:15PM Break
1:00PM-2:00PM Reimagining Ministry Visioning ~ Rev. DeeAnn Weir Morency
2:00PM-2:30PM Breakout group discussion
2:30PM-3:00PM Large group discussion
3:00PM-4:00PM Break
4:00PM-5:00PM Ministry Connection Circles
5:00PM-7:00PM Break
7:00PM-9:00PM *Not Racist vs Antiracist Workshop    
 
Package #1 – This is for all Unity Ministers, Spiritual Leaders and LUTs. 
This includes the Wednesday, October 7th, and Thursday, October 8th as well as the Not Racist vs Antiracist Workshop events via Zoom.
Cost $50.00
 
Package #2 – This is for Unity Church Board members and Lay Leaders. 
This includes the *Wed 12-2PM & Thursday Evening 7:00PM-9:00PM, Not Racist vs Antiracist Workshop on October 8th event ONLY via Zoom.   
Cost $25
 
 
For those of you who have a credit from the 2020 Key Leader Event (or for any questions) please call Kris Krause at (408) 482-2251 first, then you will need to register manually by using the registration form (once the flyer goes out) and mail it to: 
2020 Ministry Leadership Event
West Central Region
3350 Alameda St.
Medford, OR 97504
 
 
 
 

 

Facility Re-Open Guidelines link:

 

Covid-19 Loans link:

https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/paycheck-protection-program-ppp#section-header-6 

 

Unemployment for Religious Organizations benfits below:

 

Office of the General Counsel 3211 FOURTH STREET NE  WASHINGTON DC  20017-1194  202-541-3300  FAX 202-541-3337
 
MARCH 31, 2020
 
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND RELIEF PROVIDED TO RELIGIOUS NONPROFITS AND THEIR EMPLOYEES IN CARES ACT
 
 The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“the CARES Act”) creates emergency unemployment insurance benefits for individuals affected by the pandemic. The unemployment benefits described below are available to employees for organizations of all sizes.  Some of the benefits are available for furloughed employees who are still getting health insurance but not receiving a paycheck.  See Section 2102.  Some are available to part-time workers and those who are unavailable to work for COVID-19-related reasons.  Some of them are designed to reach even the self-employed, freelancers, and gig workers.  The CARES Act provides relief to (1) for-profit and nonprofit organizations that fully participate in state unemployment taxes (i.e., employees are already eligible for unemployment compensation under state law), (2) nonprofit organizations that reimburse the state for unemployment benefits when paid to terminated or laid-off employees, and (3) individuals who are not eligible to participate in state unemployment benefit programs at all, such as laid-off employees of religious employers that have opted out of the unemployment system entirely.  Religious nonprofit organizations and their separate employees generally qualify for benefits related to unemployment under the CARES Act, but the particular benefits for which they qualify depend on the organization’s current relationship to the state unemployment system.  In short: (1) If a religious organization fully participates in its state’s unemployment benefits program, its employees will, among other things, be eligible for $600 per week in addition to regular unemployment compensation under state law (Section 2104), as well a possible extension of time for provision of unemployment benefits (Section 2107).  (2) If a religious nonprofit does not pay state unemployment insurance tax, but reimburses the state for unemployment benefits paid upon the termination or laying off of an employee, the religious nonprofit will be eligible to receive 50% of the amount reimbursed to the state (Section 2103). In addition, its employees will also be eligible for the additional $600 per week (Section 2104), as well as a possible extension of time for provision of unemployment benefits (Section 2107). (3) If a religious nonprofit neither pays state unemployment insurance tax, nor reimburses the state for unemployment benefits paid upon the termination or laying off of an employee, the nonprofit does not receive any benefits under the CARES Act, but its laid-off employees will be eligible to receive Pandemic Unemployment Assistance from the federal government (Section 2102) at no cost to the employer.  Each possibility is discussed in detail below.1
 
1 Religious nonprofits that have chosen the second or third approaches above often enter arrangements with third-party vendors, whether to insure against the risks associated with their chosen approach, to farm out administration of their approach, or both.  These third-party arrangements are invisible to the CARES Act – it
 
 
 
21. CARES Act Unemployment Compensation Applicable to Individuals Already Eligible for Unemployment Compensation Under State Law The CARES Act provides a range of benefits to separated employees of employers (religious and nonreligious alike) that participate fully in state unemployment systems by paying unemployment taxes. Under section 2104 of the Act, individuals who are otherwise eligible for unemployment benefits under state or federal law will receive $600 per week, in addition to their regular unemployment compensation under state law, through July 2020.  Section 2105 provides that if a state waives its standard one-week waiting period requirement, thus paying recipients as soon as they become unemployed, the federal government will fund the cost of that first week of benefits. Under section 2107, if individuals remain unemployed after their state unemployment benefits are exhausted, the federal government will fund up to 13 weeks of additional unemployment benefits – thereby increasing to 39 weeks the 26-week maximum common under the most states’ unemployment laws – at a weekly rate of $600 during that 13-week period. Finally, under sections 2108 and 2109, the Act will provide funding to states that currently have or choose to implement a Short-Time Compensation (“STC”) program for employers that reduce their employees’ hours in lieu of a lay-off and whereby the employees thus receive a pro-rated unemployment benefit.  The federal government will fund 100% of the costs for states that currently have an STC program and 50% for those states that choose to implement one, in each case through December 31, 2020.  Seasonal, temporary, and intermittent workers are not eligible for these benefits. Employers are required to pay the State half of the amount of short-time compensation paid under the State’s STC program through the end of 2020. 2. Emergency Unemployment Relief for Governmental Entities and Nonprofits Federal unemployment law has long allowed nonprofits, religious and nonreligious alike, to selfinsure rather than pay state unemployment taxes.  Nonprofits that elect this option are required to reimburse their state unemployment insurance trust funds for the amount of benefits their terminated or laid off employees claim.  Section 2103 of the CARES Act provides a limited benefit to these selfinsured nonprofits.   Section 2103 reimburses nonprofits for half the cost of benefits provided to their terminated or laid off employees for the period beginning March 13, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2020.  This section is not applicable to nonprofits that pay state unemployment taxes like other businesses, or to religious nonprofits that have opted out of state unemployment benefits altogether.  This provision also allows the Secretary of Labor to issue guidance to states to provide flexibility for employers in making reimbursement payments.  Many Catholic employers have chosen this approach to the unemployment system, and the limited nature of this reimbursement is harmful to them.  The blow is especially harsh because, as
neither alters those arrangements, nor imposes additional benefits or burdens on employers or employees based on them.
 
 
3 religious nonprofits, these employers could have opted out of the state unemployment system, thus avoiding these costs entirely.  At this point, there are several possibilities for softening this blow.  First, as of this writing, five states (Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Montana, New Hampshire) have already passed legislation to cover the 50% of reimbursement that CARES Section 2103 does not cover, so state-level advocacy should be explored.  Second, USCCB is examining whether the missing 50% might be addressed as a part of “Phase IV” of the congressional response to the coronavirus crisis, so this will factor into our federal-level advocacy.  Third, USCCB is examining whether and (especially) how quickly a religious employer might change its approach to the state unemployment system from reimbursement to complete disengagement, so that its former employees might take advantage of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program (discussed further below) at no cost to the employer.  This is likely to include consideration of each state’s law regarding entering and exiting the unemployment system, so diocesan attorneys should consider examining this question locally.  Fourth, some employers that have chosen the reimbursement route may have already secured insurance (or otherwise pooled their risk) against the possibility of a wave of layoffs, in which case their insurer or risk retention group might take an immediate hit, but each individual policyholder / participant would not.2 3. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program for Individuals Not Otherwise Eligible for Unemployment Compensation Section 2102 creates a temporary, federally funded “Pandemic Unemployment Assistance” program, providing unemployment benefits to individuals who otherwise would be ineligible for such benefits under state or federal law, such as individuals who are self-employed (i.e., consultants or independent contractors), who are seeking part-time employment, who lack sufficient work history, or—most relevantly to us—who are employed by a religious employer that has opted out of state unemployment program altogether.  In this circumstance, the religious employer pays nothing, but the former employee receives directly from the federal government 100% of the covered individual’s regular weekly compensation, and not less than $600 per week.3 A “covered individual” under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program includes any individual who self-certifies that he or she: (1) is not otherwise eligible for, or has exhausted all rights to, unemployment benefits; and (2) is unemployed, partially unemployed, or unable to work because of any of the following COVID-19-related circumstances:
 
2 We would not expect dioceses or other Catholic employers to be able to address current reimbursement liability by securing such insurance or risk-pooling arrangements now, although such arrangements may be available to mitigate future risk.  We note the possibility here, however, in case such arrangements may already be in place. 3 As with the reimbursement approach, third-party vendors are sometimes involved when a diocese or other religious nonprofit has opted out of the state unemployment system altogether.  For example, a diocese or other Catholic employer might contract with a vendor to provide separated employees with a benefit that emulates state unemployment benefits but involves no connection at all with the state system.  In this circumstance, it appears that separated employees would be able to “double dip”—receiving both the private benefit provided by the employer, and the federal benefit under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program.  If dioceses have promised such a private benefit to their employees as a contractual matter, they would face the same risk of a surge of layoffs that reimbursing employers face, as described above, and so might similarly insure against this risk with a third-party insurer.
 
4- The individual has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis; - A member of the individual’s household has been diagnosed with COVID-19; - The individual is providing care for a family member or household member who has been diagnosed with COVID-19; - The individual is the primary caregiver for a child or other person in the household who is unable to attend school or another facility that has been closed as a direct result of the COVID19 public health emergency and such school or facility care is required for the individual to work; - The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual is unable to reach the place of unemployment because a health care provider has advised the individual to self-quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns; - The individual was scheduled to begin employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual has become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of household has died as a direct result of COVID-19; - The individual has to quit his or her job as a direct result of COVID-19; - The individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual meets any additional criteria established by the Secretary of Labor for unemployment assistance under this section of the Act. Benefits under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program are available for the duration of the covered individual’s period of unemployment, partial unemployment, or inability to work, beginning retroactively on or after January 27, 2020, and ending on or before December 31, 2020, up to a maximum of 39 weeks.  It should be noted that “partial unemployment” has not been defined for purposes of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program but is generally understood to mean that an employee has had his or her hours and wages reduced, but has not been terminated (e.g., a furloughed employee).  The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program excludes any individuals who are able to telework with pay, or who are currently receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits. Unlike many states’ unemployment laws, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program does not require a covered individual to be actively seeking work to receive unemployment benefits under the program.  Also unlike many state laws, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program does not require any waiting period before eligibility for benefits. The Office of General Counsel will continue to research these issues and update this memorandum as necessary.  Please direct any questions to Madeline Obler (mobler@usccb.org; 202541-3310). Office of the General Counsel 3211 FOURTH STREET NE  WASHINGTON DC  20017-1194  202-541-3300  FAX 202-541-3337
 
MARCH 31, 2020
 
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND RELIEF PROVIDED TO RELIGIOUS NONPROFITS AND THEIR EMPLOYEES IN CARES ACT
 
 The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“the CARES Act”) creates emergency unemployment insurance benefits for individuals affected by the pandemic. The unemployment benefits described below are available to employees for organizations of all sizes.  Some of the benefits are available for furloughed employees who are still getting health insurance but not receiving a paycheck.  See Section 2102.  Some are available to part-time workers and those who are unavailable to work for COVID-19-related reasons.  Some of them are designed to reach even the self-employed, freelancers, and gig workers.  The CARES Act provides relief to (1) for-profit and nonprofit organizations that fully participate in state unemployment taxes (i.e., employees are already eligible for unemployment compensation under state law), (2) nonprofit organizations that reimburse the state for unemployment benefits when paid to terminated or laid-off employees, and (3) individuals who are not eligible to participate in state unemployment benefit programs at all, such as laid-off employees of religious employers that have opted out of the unemployment system entirely.  Religious nonprofit organizations and their separate employees generally qualify for benefits related to unemployment under the CARES Act, but the particular benefits for which they qualify depend on the organization’s current relationship to the state unemployment system.  In short: (1) If a religious organization fully participates in its state’s unemployment benefits program, its employees will, among other things, be eligible for $600 per week in addition to regular unemployment compensation under state law (Section 2104), as well a possible extension of time for provision of unemployment benefits (Section 2107).  (2) If a religious nonprofit does not pay state unemployment insurance tax, but reimburses the state for unemployment benefits paid upon the termination or laying off of an employee, the religious nonprofit will be eligible to receive 50% of the amount reimbursed to the state (Section 2103). In addition, its employees will also be eligible for the additional $600 per week (Section 2104), as well as a possible extension of time for provision of unemployment benefits (Section 2107). (3) If a religious nonprofit neither pays state unemployment insurance tax, nor reimburses the state for unemployment benefits paid upon the termination or laying off of an employee, the nonprofit does not receive any benefits under the CARES Act, but its laid-off employees will be eligible to receive Pandemic Unemployment Assistance from the federal government (Section 2102) at no cost to the employer.  Each possibility is discussed in detail below.1
 
1 Religious nonprofits that have chosen the second or third approaches above often enter arrangements with third-party vendors, whether to insure against the risks associated with their chosen approach, to farm out administration of their approach, or both.  These third-party arrangements are invisible to the CARES Act – it
 
21. CARES Act Unemployment Compensation Applicable to Individuals Already Eligible for Unemployment Compensation Under State Law The CARES Act provides a range of benefits to separated employees of employers (religious and nonreligious alike) that participate fully in state unemployment systems by paying unemployment taxes. Under section 2104 of the Act, individuals who are otherwise eligible for unemployment benefits under state or federal law will receive $600 per week, in addition to their regular unemployment compensation under state law, through July 2020.  Section 2105 provides that if a state waives its standard one-week waiting period requirement, thus paying recipients as soon as they become unemployed, the federal government will fund the cost of that first week of benefits. Under section 2107, if individuals remain unemployed after their state unemployment benefits are exhausted, the federal government will fund up to 13 weeks of additional unemployment benefits – thereby increasing to 39 weeks the 26-week maximum common under the most states’ unemployment laws – at a weekly rate of $600 during that 13-week period. Finally, under sections 2108 and 2109, the Act will provide funding to states that currently have or choose to implement a Short-Time Compensation (“STC”) program for employers that reduce their employees’ hours in lieu of a lay-off and whereby the employees thus receive a pro-rated unemployment benefit.  The federal government will fund 100% of the costs for states that currently have an STC program and 50% for those states that choose to implement one, in each case through December 31, 2020.  Seasonal, temporary, and intermittent workers are not eligible for these benefits. Employers are required to pay the State half of the amount of short-time compensation paid under the State’s STC program through the end of 2020. 2. Emergency Unemployment Relief for Governmental Entities and Nonprofits Federal unemployment law has long allowed nonprofits, religious and nonreligious alike, to selfinsure rather than pay state unemployment taxes.  Nonprofits that elect this option are required to reimburse their state unemployment insurance trust funds for the amount of benefits their terminated or laid off employees claim.  Section 2103 of the CARES Act provides a limited benefit to these selfinsured nonprofits.   Section 2103 reimburses nonprofits for half the cost of benefits provided to their terminated or laid off employees for the period beginning March 13, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2020.  This section is not applicable to nonprofits that pay state unemployment taxes like other businesses, or to religious nonprofits that have opted out of state unemployment benefits altogether.  This provision also allows the Secretary of Labor to issue guidance to states to provide flexibility for employers in making reimbursement payments.  Many Catholic employers have chosen this approach to the unemployment system, and the limited nature of this reimbursement is harmful to them.  The blow is especially harsh because, as
neither alters those arrangements, nor imposes additional benefits or burdens on employers or employees based on them.
 
3 religious nonprofits, these employers could have opted out of the state unemployment system, thus avoiding these costs entirely.  At this point, there are several possibilities for softening this blow.  First, as of this writing, five states (Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Montana, New Hampshire) have already passed legislation to cover the 50% of reimbursement that CARES Section 2103 does not cover, so state-level advocacy should be explored.  Second, USCCB is examining whether the missing 50% might be addressed as a part of “Phase IV” of the congressional response to the coronavirus crisis, so this will factor into our federal-level advocacy.  Third, USCCB is examining whether and (especially) how quickly a religious employer might change its approach to the state unemployment system from reimbursement to complete disengagement, so that its former employees might take advantage of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program (discussed further below) at no cost to the employer.  This is likely to include consideration of each state’s law regarding entering and exiting the unemployment system, so diocesan attorneys should consider examining this question locally.  Fourth, some employers that have chosen the reimbursement route may have already secured insurance (or otherwise pooled their risk) against the possibility of a wave of layoffs, in which case their insurer or risk retention group might take an immediate hit, but each individual policyholder / participant would not.2 3. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program for Individuals Not Otherwise Eligible for Unemployment Compensation Section 2102 creates a temporary, federally funded “Pandemic Unemployment Assistance” program, providing unemployment benefits to individuals who otherwise would be ineligible for such benefits under state or federal law, such as individuals who are self-employed (i.e., consultants or independent contractors), who are seeking part-time employment, who lack sufficient work history, or—most relevantly to us—who are employed by a religious employer that has opted out of state unemployment program altogether.  In this circumstance, the religious employer pays nothing, but the former employee receives directly from the federal government 100% of the covered individual’s regular weekly compensation, and not less than $600 per week.3 A “covered individual” under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program includes any individual who self-certifies that he or she: (1) is not otherwise eligible for, or has exhausted all rights to, unemployment benefits; and (2) is unemployed, partially unemployed, or unable to work because of any of the following COVID-19-related circumstances:
 
2 We would not expect dioceses or other Catholic employers to be able to address current reimbursement liability by securing such insurance or risk-pooling arrangements now, although such arrangements may be available to mitigate future risk.  We note the possibility here, however, in case such arrangements may already be in place. 3 As with the reimbursement approach, third-party vendors are sometimes involved when a diocese or other religious nonprofit has opted out of the state unemployment system altogether.  For example, a diocese or other Catholic employer might contract with a vendor to provide separated employees with a benefit that emulates state unemployment benefits but involves no connection at all with the state system.  In this circumstance, it appears that separated employees would be able to “double dip”—receiving both the private benefit provided by the employer, and the federal benefit under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program.  If dioceses have promised such a private benefit to their employees as a contractual matter, they would face the same risk of a surge of layoffs that reimbursing employers face, as described above, and so might similarly insure against this risk with a third-party insurer.
 
4- The individual has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis; - A member of the individual’s household has been diagnosed with COVID-19; - The individual is providing care for a family member or household member who has been diagnosed with COVID-19; - The individual is the primary caregiver for a child or other person in the household who is unable to attend school or another facility that has been closed as a direct result of the COVID19 public health emergency and such school or facility care is required for the individual to work; - The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual is unable to reach the place of unemployment because a health care provider has advised the individual to self-quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns; - The individual was scheduled to begin employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual has become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of household has died as a direct result of COVID-19; - The individual has to quit his or her job as a direct result of COVID-19; - The individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency; - The individual meets any additional criteria established by the Secretary of Labor for unemployment assistance under this section of the Act. Benefits under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program are available for the duration of the covered individual’s period of unemployment, partial unemployment, or inability to work, beginning retroactively on or after January 27, 2020, and ending on or before December 31, 2020, up to a maximum of 39 weeks.  It should be noted that “partial unemployment” has not been defined for purposes of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program but is generally understood to mean that an employee has had his or her hours and wages reduced, but has not been terminated (e.g., a furloughed employee).  The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program excludes any individuals who are able to telework with pay, or who are currently receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits. Unlike many states’ unemployment laws, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program does not require a covered individual to be actively seeking work to receive unemployment benefits under the program.  Also unlike many state laws, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program does not require any waiting period before eligibility for benefits. The Office of General Counsel will continue to research these issues and update this memorandum as necessary.  Please direct any questions to Madeline Obler (mobler@usccb.org; 202541-3310).

 

 

 

Minister, Spiritual Leader, and LUT Event
Thursday and Friday, October 7 & 8, 2020
REGISTER HERE

 

Upcoming Youth Events

Leadership Retreat

Not available at this time 

Sponsor: Mike Gomez cell 707-301-0960 or mike@hotmail.com

 

Y.O.U. Rally

Not available at this time

Sponsor: Mike Gomez cell 707-301-0960 or mike@hotmail.com